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Tuesday, July 21, 2020 | History

3 edition of Transforming proteins of DNA tumor viruses found in the catalog.

Transforming proteins of DNA tumor viruses

Transforming proteins of DNA tumor viruses

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Published by Springer-Verlag in Berlin, London .
Written in English


Edition Notes

Statementedited by R. Knippers and A.J. Levine.
SeriesCurrent topics in microbiology and immunology -- 144
ContributionsKnippers, R., Levine, Arnold J.
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL21343042M
ISBN 100387509097

Among the smaller DNA tumor viruses such as human polyomaviruses and papillomaviruses, only one or two genes show transforming potential. The function of the large T antigen of polyomavirus has been divided between two viral proteins, E6 and E7, in papillomaviruses.   Although there are numerous examples of viral oncogenes that encode protein kinases (Hunter, ), until recently there has been no evidence linking altered phosphatase activity to transformation. In this review we describe a novel mechanism, utilized by small DNA tumor viruses, in which viral oncogenes bind to and regulate a cellular protein.

As with the other DNA tumor viruses, JCV and BKV are tropic for cells that are normally non-dividing and, thus, must induce S-phase to usurp host cell replication factors. Both viruses have transforming activity in tissue culture, albeit reduced in comparison with SV40, and both viruses are oncogenic in . Role of T-antigen in DNA tumor virus transformation - When viral T-antigens bind to Rb, E2f proteins are released and initiate S phase transcription - Rb is normally bound up to E2f, that keeps the cells from going through DNA synthesis.

- viral markers are usually present in tumor cells - one virus may be associated with more than one type of tumor - applicable to both DNA and RNA tumor viruses: the proviral DNA is integrated into the host cell genome, only viral gene expression, not replication of the viral genome or production of progeny virus, is required for transformation. Simian virus 40 (SV40) is a DNA virus isolated in from contaminated polio vaccines, that induces mesotheliomas, lymphomas, brain and bone tumors, and sarcomas, including osteosarcomas, in hamsters. These same tumor types have been found to contain SV40 DNA and proteins in humans. Mesotheliomas .


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Transforming proteins of DNA tumor viruses Download PDF EPUB FB2

SV40 and Polyomavirus. The best studied DNA tumor viruses, from the standpoint of molecular biology, are probably simian virus 40 (SV40) and gh neither of these viruses is associated with human cancer, they have been critically important as models for understanding the molecular basis of cell utility of these viruses in cancer research has stemmed from the.

It was pre­ cisely because of these factors that it was time to hold a meeting and publish its proceedings on the subject of transforming proteins of DNA tumor viruses. For the first time, DNA tumor viruses were defined as all of the virus groups that can contribute to cancer in animals with the exception, unfortunately, of the.

poxviruses. This book serves as an excellent text in comparative virology, with an up-to-data overview and detail for each group of DNA tumor viruses. The authors review the common and diverse mechanisms of action of the transforming proteins of DNA tumor viruses.

Transforming proteins of DNA tumor viruses. [Rolf Knippers; Arnold J Levine;] Home. WorldCat Home About WorldCat Help. Search. Search for Library Items Search for Lists Search for Book, Internet Resource: All Authors / Contributors: Rolf Knippers; Arnold J Levine.

Find more information about: ISBN: Polyoma virus, like SV40, is a DNA tumor virus that encodes a potent transforming protein, Polyoma virus middle tumor antigen (PyVmT).

Infection of newborn or athymic mice with the Polyoma virus results in formation of mammary adenocarcinomas along with multiple other tumors types (Asch, ), and it was demonstrated that the middle T.

Chronic transforming retroviruses (such as HTLV1, mouse mammary tumor virus and avian leukosis virus) possess no cellular sequences and instead transform cells by the effects of the random integration of a DNA copy of the virus, termed the provirus, into the host cell genome. The provirus can affect the genes in the region of the host.

DNA tumor viruses have long been useful experimental models of carcinogenesis and have elucidated several important mechanisms of cell transformation. Re­ search in recent years has shown that human t. The latter is not typical of most DNA tumor viruses but reverse transcription is a very important factor in the life cycles of RNA-tumor viruses.

See below. For more information on the molecular biology of hepatitis B virus and the diseases it causes, go to chapter 18 and chap part 2. Certainly, DNA tumor viruses carry oncogenes (e.g. SV40 T-antigen) but how do these proteins, encoded in true viral genes with no cellular homologs, cause the formation of tumors.

It has long been known that most tumors are the result of dominant mutations, i.e. a function is gained that makes the cell grow when it should not (Figure 24).

An oncovirus is a virus that can cause term originated from studies of acutely transforming retroviruses in the –60s, when the term "oncornaviruses" was used to denote their RNA virus origin. With the letters "RNA" removed, it now refers to any virus with a DNA or RNA genome causing cancer and is synonymous with "tumor virus" or "cancer virus".

Tumor Viruses Virus Cell Integration (often) Transformation Latent Life Cycle Some virus-specific proteins expressed (early functions) - No mature virus Viral structural proteins are not expressed Changes in the properties of host cell - TRANSFORMATION Sometimes latency may terminate – cell must be infected by complete virus www.

This book serves as an excellent text in comparative virology, with an up-to-date overview and detail for each group of DNA tumor viruses. The authors review the common and diverse mechanisms of action of the transforming proteins of DNA tumor viruses.

Viral transformation is the change in growth, phenotype, or indefinite reproduction of cells caused by the introduction of inheritable material. Through this process, a virus causes harmful transformations of an in vivo cell or cell term can also be understood as DNA transfection using a viral vector.

Thus, DNA tumor viruses serve as models for the systems biology of host-pathogen interactions. "DNA Tumor Viruses," edited by Blossom Damania and James M. Pipas, summarizes recent advances in our understanding of this diverse and fascinating collection of viruses. The book concludes by evaluating the possibility of direct etiologic involvement of either endogenous or exogenous RNA tumor viruses in human cancers.

This book will be of value both to graduate students and to established investigators with specific interest in other aspects of molecular biology.

against cervical cancer, using the HPV L1 capsid protein [6]. Transformation and oncogenesis HPV is a small double-stranded DNA virus, 8 kb in size [7].

It is a member of the papovavirus family. Primary infection occurs in the basal stem cells of the epithelium. The virus. Tumor DNA viruses enhance “aerobic” glycolysis upon virus-induced cell transformation, supporting rapid cell proliferation and showing the Warburg effect.

Moreover, viral proteins enhance glucose uptake and controls tumor microenvironment, promoting metastasizing of the tumor cells. Only part of the viral genome is expressed. These are the early control functions of the virus. Viral structural proteins are not made, and no progeny virus is released.

The first DNA tumor viruses to be discovered were rabbit fibroma virus and Shope papilloma virus, both discovered by Richard Shope in.

Virus - Virus - Malignant transformation: A phenomenon analogous to bacterial cell lysogeny occurs in animal cells infected with certain viruses. These animal viruses do not generally cause disease immediately for certain animal cells.

Instead, animal cells are persistently infected with such viruses, the DNA of which (provirus) is integrated into the chromosomal DNA of the host cell.

Transformation by DNA and RNA viruses 1. Transformation by DNA and RNA viruses 2. In molecular biology, transformation is the genetic alteration of a cell resulting from the direct uptake, incorporation and expression of exogenous genetic material (exogenous DNA) from its surroundings and taken up through the cell membrane(s).

Transforming proteins of DNA tumor viruses. (PMID) Abstract Citations; Related Articles; Data; BioEntities; External Links; Current Topics in Microbiology and Immunology [01 Jan] Type: Journal Article.

Abstract. No abstract provided. •) CitePeer Related Articles.Studies using the transforming proteins of the small DNA tumor viruses point to the role of the E2F cellular transcription factor in regulating cell cycle specific gene expression.

The evidence derived suggests that E2F is controlled by the retinoblastoma gene product and related proteins, including their associated cyclins.

Studies using DNA tumor virus products further suggest the existence.Transforming proteins of DNA tumor viruses. During the past three decades, research with the transforming proteins of small DNA tumor viruses such as human adenoviruses (HAdvs), SV40 and human papillomaviruses (HPVs) has illuminated critical cellular pathways that control proliferation and oncogenic transformation of mammalian by: